Rusty-patched Bumblebee Information
Pocket ID guide to Bombus Affinis, Rusty-patched Bumblebee (pdf)
A Flower Patch for the Rusty-patched poster, large file- (pdf)
Bumblebee Watch Postcard (pdf)

Throughout the year, the countless eyes and ears of our visitors help us record plant, animal, bird, herptile and insect sightings. Recording the movements, emergence and flowering dates of Pinery’s organisms helps in long term monitoring and greatly adds to our interpretative programs.

Checklists
Mammals (pdf)Reptiles (pdf)Plants (pdf)
Fish (pdf)Trees (pdf)Insects (pdf)
Birds (pdf)Butterflies (pdf)Fungi (pdf)

Wildlife Viewing Do’s and Don’ts

While we cannot tell you exactly how to go about spotting all of Pinery’s wildlife species, we can give you some pointers that will increase your chances of viewing wildlife during your stay at Pinery.

Do’s:
Go out in the early morning. Many bird and mammal species are active at this time of the day because of the cool morning temperatures. As well, most of your fellow campers are still sleeping, and the park will be quiet.

Ride a bike along the bike path and pull off to the side of the road often to stop, look and listen.

Walk silently along a trail and pause to sit at one of the many benches for a few minutes. The key to seeing birds and animals is to be quiet and patient.

Binoculars can often help you get a closer look at many birds and mammals, but all that’s needed is a keen eye and ear.

Don’ts:
Never offer food to any wildlife, it creates nuisance animals and is illegal in Provincial Parks. Once an animal becomes familiar with the high energy food that humans consume, they will never go back to a natural diet.

Never touch or capture any wildlife. Adult animals often leave their young alone while they forage for food. Once in captive care, many animals will die as we cannot provide all of the requirements for them to live.

Never harass or chase wildlife. Many animals will die from the stress of even a short chase. Dogs that are not kept on a leash often kill several deer simply from chasing them until the deer collapse in exhaustion.

Mammals

Thirty-two species of mammals have been recorded at Pinery. A few of the park’s most commonly seen mammals are red squirrels, chipmunks, raccoons, beavers, coyotes and flying squirrels.

Another mammal that most people enjoy seeing while they are at Pinery is the White-tailed Deer.  Your best chance at viewing deer is along the bike trail through the day-use area.  Bike along the trail in early evening or morning; especially in late October and early November watch for a large buck deer with antlers full-grown and polished, ready for the rut or mating season.

Please refer to the Checklist of Mammals of Pinery Provincial Park (links to checklists are on this page) for a listing of specific species found in the park.  Books containing more information about Pinery’s mammals can be purchased at the Friends of Pinery Nature Store in Pinery’s Visitor Centre.

Take your time, be  patient, and you should be rewarded with sightings of  mammals. As well you should follow the basic Wildlife Viewing Do’s and Don’ts that are listed on this page.

Please join a Park Naturalist on a conducted walk, children’s program, evening program, or for one of our Night Walks to learn more about the Park’s mammals. All of these programs are part of our well-known Summer Interpretive Program.  Naturalists are also on duty at the Visitor Centre to assist you with your questions.

Anyone interested in conducting research on the mammals of Pinery park is required to contact the Natural Heritage Education Supervisor at the Visitor Centre.

Reptiles and Amphibians

Twenty-nine different species of reptiles and amphibians have been recorded for Pinery. Reptiles include seven species of turtles, Ontario’s only species of lizard, the Five-lined Skink, and eight species of snakes (none of which are venomous).  Amphibian records include five species of salamanders, and eight species of frogs and toads.

 

 

 

 

Pinery hosts a diversity of reptiles and amphibians and plays an important role in the protection of habitat for their survival in the Grand Bend area. Many of the landscapes of Southern Ontario have been drastically altered in the last century, with over 93% of the forests and marshes being cleared in this area.  Many reptiles and amphibians, like the Blue Racer and the Bull Frog, have become quite rare or have disappeared entirely from this area.  As well, factors that threaten the survival of reptiles and amphibians include: road traffic, human persecution of snakes, and commercial exploitation. The importance of protection for natural areas -like Pinery- in Southwestern Ontario as well as the education of the public about their role in the ecosystem is crucial to the survival of these creatures.

Please refer to the Checklist of Reptiles and Amphibians of Pinery Provincial Park (links to checklists are on this page) for a listing of specific species found in the park.  Books containing more information about Pinery’s reptiles and amphibians can be purchased at the Friends of Pinery Nature Store in Pinery’s Visitor Centre.

Please join a Park Naturalist on a conducted walk, children’s program, evening program, or for one of our Night Walks to learn more about the Park’s reptiles or amphibians. All of these programs are part of our well-known Summer Interpretive Program.  Live displays of reptiles and amphibians are found in the Visitor Centre.

School and youth groups may want to book a Visitor Centre Tour, and see live snakes on display. Programs can be booked through our Group Educational Programs.

Birds

Pinery’s rare habitats provide shelter and space for 319 different species of birds, 124 of which have nested in the park.  You can watch the magnificent migration of thousands of Tundra Swans in March or watch Warblers pass through in May and June.  Observe Red-throated Loons off the beach in the fall, or walk the trails in summer looking for a brilliant Scarlet Tanager, Baltimore Oriole or Cerulean Warbler.  In the winter, Red-tailed Hawks and Tufted Titmice are common sights at the Visitor Centre feeders.

For those wishing to learn more about the birds of Pinery Provincial Park, The Friends of Pinery have produced a Checklist and Seasonal Status of the Birds of Pinery Provincial Park (links to checklists are on this page). This publication may also be purchased at the Friends of Pinery Nature Store located in the Visitor Centre.

For those people visiting the Park in the summer months, we invite you to join a Park Naturalist for a bird walk or an evening program on birds ­ part of the programming in our well-known Summer Interpretive Program.

Many special events discuss the lives of our avian inhabitants including; Return of the Swans Festival, Pinery Migration Weekend, Halloween Owl Prowl, and the Christmas Bird Count. Times and locations of the these events can be checked through the Special Events Calendar.

School and youth groups may wish to learn more about Pinery’s birds by booking a program, or joining us for a Bird Hike. These programs can be booked through our Group Education Program.

Anyone interested in conducting research about the birds in the park is encouraged to contact our research coordinator.