Ontario Bat Species

Ontario is home to eight species of bats, including 7 endangered species. You will find an introduction to each species below. The first six species listed have been seen or recorded by acoustic monitoring equipment in Pinery.

LITTLE BROWN MYOTIS BAT (MYOTIS LUCIFUGUS)

Little Brown Myotis (Myotis lucifugus)

Little Brown Myotis (Myotis lucifugus)

*ENDANGERED IN CANADA*

Seen in Pinery

  • SIZE: 4–11g, average forearm size 38mm
  • ROOSTS: Small, enclosed spaces including rock crevices, hollow trees, and human-made structures like house, barns, or bat boxes
  • DIET: Wide variety of insects, often over water
  • WINTER BEHAVIOUR: Hibernates in caves or abandoned mines
  • FUN FACT: Often found in houses and therefore frequently seen by humans
Big Brown Bat (Eptesicus fuscus)

Big Brown Bat (Eptesicus fuscus)

Big Brown Bat (Eptesicus fuscus)

Seen in Pinery

  • SIZE: 10–21g, average forearm size 45mm
  • ROOSTS: Small cavities in hollow trees, rock crevices, and buildings
  • DIET: Wide variety of insects, especially beetles
  • WINTER BEHAVIOUR: Hibernates in caves, abandoned mines, or buildings
  • FUN FACT: Second largest bat species in Ontario; often found in houses and therefore frequently seen by humans
Eastern Red Bat (Lasiurus borealis)

Eastern Red Bat (Lasiurus Borealis)

Eastern Red Bat (Lasiurus borealis)

*ENDANGERED IN CANADA*

Seen in Pinery

  • SIZE: 8–18g, average forearm size 40mm
  • ROOSTS: Solitary in foliage
  • DIET: Wide variety of insects, especially moths
  • WINTER BEHAVIOUR: Migrates, but migration routes are unknown
  • FUN FACT: High, fast fliers; often seen foraging around streetlights
HOARY BAT (Lasiurus cinereus)

Hoary Bat (Lasiurus cinereus)

Hoary Bat (Lasiurus cinereus)

*ENDANGERED IN CANADA*

Seen in Pinery

  • SIZE: 18–39g, average forearm size 54mm
  • ROOSTS: Solitary in foliage
  • DIET: Insects (especially moths), occasionally grass, small snakes, and small bats
  • WINTER BEHAVIOUR: Migrates, likely to Mexico
  • FUN FACT: Largest bat species in Ontario; often seen foraging around streetlights
TRI-COLOURED BAT (Perimyotis subflavu) on leaf

Tri-coloured Bat (Perimyotis subflavus)

Tri-coloured Bat (Perimyotis subflavus)

*ENDANGERED IN CANADA*

Recorded in Pinery

  • SIZE: 5–7g, average forearm size 35mm
  • ROOSTS: Small spaces or in foliage
  • DIET: Wide variety of insects
  • WINTER BEHAVIOUR: Hibernates in caves or abandoned mines
  • FUN FACT: The only foliage-roosting species in Ontario that roosts in groups
SILVER-HAIRED BAT (Lasionycteris noctivagans)

Silver-haired Bat (Lasionycteris Noctivagans)

Silver-haired Bat (Lasionycteris noctivagans)

*ENDANGERED IN CANADA*

Recorded in Pinery

  • SIZE: 9–13g, average forearm size 41mm
  • ROOSTS: Cavities such as hollow trees
  • DIET: Wide variety of insects, often over water
  • WINTER BEHAVIOUR: Migrates, but migration routes are unknown
  • FUN FACT: Sometimes roosts on the outside of buildings during the fall migration
EASTERN SMALL-FOOTED MYOTIS (Myotis leibii) in flight

Eastern small-footed Myotis (Myotis leibii)

Eastern small-footed Myotis (Myotis leibii)

*ENDANGERED IN ONTARIO*

  • SIZE: 3–5g, average forearm size 32mm
  • ROOSTS: Few records exist in Ontario, but probably in small spaces such as behind window shutters
  • DIET: Wide variety of insects
  • WINTER BEHAVIOUR: Hibernates in caves or abandoned mines
  • FUN FACT: The least studied Ontario bat species; strongly resembles the Little Brown Myotis, but is smaller with a dark facial mask
NORTHERN LONG-EARED MYOTIS (Myotis septentrionalis)

Northern long-eared Myotis (Myotis Septentrionalis)

Northern Myotis (Myotis septentrionalis)

*ENDANGERED IN CANADA*

  • SIZE: 4–7g, average forearm size 36mm
  • ROOSTS: In small crevices, under bark, or in human-made structures
  • DIET: Wide variety of insects, including flightless insects and spiders
  • WINTER BEHAVIOUR: Hibernates in caves or abandoned mines
  • FUN FACT: The only bat in Ontario that has been observed gleaning (catching non-flying prey off of tree leaves, grasses, or the ground)

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